Pears

Pears

Pears

Pears are an excellent source of pectin, a water-soluble fiber. They are a good source of vitamins B2, C, and E. Pears are also rich in copper, and potassium. They are also easily digestible, partially due to being low in acidity, and are often the first fruit suggested to feed to infants.

Pectin


Pectin is a type of soluble fiber that binds to fatty substances in the digestive tract and promotes their elimination. This helps lower blood cholesterol level, and to regulate the body's use of sugars. Diets high in fiber may reduce the risk of heart disease, certain types of cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Many practitioners suggest following the glycemic index (GI), which is a scale from 1 to 100 that ranks how foods affect blood sugar. Foods that are high in carbohydrates naturally increase blood sugar. The lower a food is on the GI, the less that food increases blood sugar. A medium-sized pear ranks 38 on the GI and is considered a low glycemic food.

Fruit-GI

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.  Pears are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Pears are a food, not a drug or dietary supplement.